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Wednesday, February 16, 2005

"Mazurka" Op17 no2 by Chopin

"Mazurka" is a great piece. The minorness of the piece paired with the intricate rhythms create a picturesque feeling of Lenten wander and excited flurry for the coming future. It is a parallel period with the first phrase ending with a half cadence after 12 measures and the second symmetrical phrase ending on a PAC. This first section is an expository section presenting the theme for the entire piece. The next section is divided into two 8 measure symmetrical phrases. It makes another parallel period with the first phrase ending on an IAC and the second ending on a PAC of a new key. This section is also expository with new material. The following 12 materials consist of repetitious transitional material that eventually brings us back to our original key of e minor and the first theme. After the first 10 measures of this original expository material, it changes and instead of creating another parallel period, it seems to begin terminative functions to finish the piece. This piece uses rhythm and dynamics within structural phenomena to its advantage. The tempo fluctuates frequently while the many sixteenth rests add spunk and the fzs really draw out the beginning of new melodic material. Many rhythmic motives are repeated and the triplet and eighth functions seem to be written to correlate with what we're studying in sight-reading rhythms during theory.

3 comments:

bodony said...

Minorness! Great word. I am no expert on Chopin but it seems like most of his phrases tend to last longer, like 10, 12, or 18 bars, while Schubert and Schumann seem to more focus on 4 and 8 bar phrases.

John Styx said...

I agree with Bodony, that Chopin tended to shy away from simple 4 and 8 bar phrases, usually with 12 bars, sometimes it seemed like he would add a third person into the conversation, or much like Ben Affleck, always try to add on a little extra to every piece of conversation in a work. Sorry for the Affleck reference, but watched one of his movies earlier this week while laid up in bed and noticed that he almost always had the last word in every dialogue...it was odd, that's all I'm trying to say. And once again the topic eludes me...

Queen_Neopolitan said...

nice comment bodony, and marena--great description of the piece! "a picturesque feeling of Lenten wander and excited flurry for the coming future" BRILLIANT. (sigh).