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Monday, February 21, 2005

Gavotte from English Suite no. 3 in G minor

j.s. bach's gavotte from the english suite no 3 in g minor is an example of a piece in simple binary form. there are two distinct sections, an A section and a B section, divided by a double bar. both of these sections are repeated, and both present new ideas. part A is "open" because the end of the phrase does not end in the key it started in. in fact, it modulates to the relative major (from g minor to b flat major). the whole piece is considered simple binary form because there is no return of the exposition...although the beginning of the B section provides a similar motivic gesture as the A section, it is not repeated in the same key. the B section is not harmonically dependent on the A section. B however, can be thought of as a mix between a transitional and development section because it changes the key back to g minor after it previously changed to its relative (b flat) major and is significantly less stable (tonally) than part A.

3 comments:

Liz said...

Woops - you're right about section A being open. I forgot the rule that the phrase has to end in the original key for it to be considered closed. Thanks!

Ihearthautbois said...

Damn it Sus, I'm a dumb dumb. I thought that if the b section ended in the original key it was closed...
I guess Liz and I are both stupid.

Kaberle said...

I agree with the thought that the B section could really be seen from both points of view..transitional and developmental...way to keep an open mind...later